Proven UAV Hardware Solutions

UAV Propulsion Tech is a US company located in Tampa, FL that markets advanced UAV technology from Germany, Austria, India, Canada, Sweden, United Kingdom, France and Estonia into the US Unmanned Aerial Vehicle market. These solutions include consumer off the shelf (COTs) and custom hardware solutions that are flying on several high-end global UAV platforms. This website provides more info about the solutions available to the US market.

Contact us today
  • Aeron Systems inertial navigation systems & digital magnetic compass

    Aeron Systems inertial navigation systems & digital magnetic compass

  • Nova Ray Underwater Remote Operated Vehicle

    Nova Ray Underwater Remote Operated Vehicle

  • Reventec Ltd. capacitive liquid level and engine sensors

    Reventec Ltd. capacitive liquid level and engine sensors

  • Neva Aerospace electric turbofans optimized for static thrust for VTOLs

    Neva Aerospace electric turbofans optimized for static thrust for VTOLs

  • DST Control gyro-stabilized electro-optical systems (EO/IR) & small light-weight thermal imagers

    DST Control gyro-stabilized electro-optical systems (EO/IR) & small light-weight thermal imagers

  • MicroPilot Autopilots

    MicroPilot Autopilots

  • Protect UAV Rescue/Recovery Chutes

    Protect UAV Rescue/Recovery Chutes

  • Hirth Propulsion Solutions

    Hirth Propulsion Solutions

  • Volz Servo Actuators

    Volz Servo Actuators

DST Control

DST Control

Light-weight, high performance gyro-stabilized electro-optical systems with both EO and IR capabilities, and small light-weight thermal imagers.
Read More
Hirth Motoren GmbH & Co. KG

Hirth Motoren GmbH & Co. KG

Consumer off the shelf and custom aircraft propulsion systems including starter/generator systems.
Read More
Volz Servos GmbH & Co. KG

Volz Servos GmbH & Co. KG

Consumer off the shelf and custom actuators for industrial and aerospace applications.
Read More
MicroPilot

MicroPilot

Consumer off the shelf and custom autopilots for helicopter, fixed wing, and multi-rotor UAV's.
Read More

UAV Propulsion Tech Post #33 – Nova Ray Unmanned Marine Vehicles

Coral Partners’ Nova Ray® ROVs presents at Global Unmanned Systems Conference in Zhuhai, China.

Independent Advisor to Coral Partners: Dr. Tim McGuinness, was the Featured Speaker at the Global Unmanned Systems Conference. This event was held December 13 through 15, 2017 in Zhuhai, China.  The three-day event included speakers from major UAV & unmanned manufacturers, and manufacturer exhibits, including new products that will not yet be announced to the rest of the world until 2018.  He spoke on the future of unmanned vehicles, focusing on the future of underwater unmanned systems, and the promise of winged underwater flight – as represented by Nova Ray® remotely operated vehicles.   The key slides from this featured presentation are posted below:

Re-Printed with permission from Coral Partners.

Photos from the event:

You can find out more info about this great underwater technology by visiting my NOVA RAY page at http://uavpropulsiontech.com/nova-ray-rov.   If you have any questions regarding these solutions, please call or email me at: bob@uavpropulsiontech.com.  PH: +1 (810) 441-1457


Key UAV News for the Week:

Industry Events for January/February:

Quote for the week:

“Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving.” – Albert Einstein.

UAV Propulsion Tech is unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) hardware solution provider of propulsion, servo, autopilot, rescue/recovery parachutes, electric turbofans, pneumatic launchers, capacitive liquid level sensors, engine sensors and gyro-stabilized EO/IR gimbal solutions. Click on the HOME link above or go to www.uavpropulsiontech.com for more info.

 

UAV Propulsion Tech Post #32 – 2017 Year in Review

I thought it would be good to close out the year with highlights and news from the various companies represented by UAV Propulsion Tech here in the US. It has been a busy and productive year as highlighted below.  First, we have added several new companies and their advanced UAV hardware solutions.  These include:

Eli Airborne Systems – Estonia:  I wanted to add more COTS (consumer off the shelf) hardware that doesn’t require R&D effort.  Eli has a nice pneumatic launcher that used to be offered by MicroPilot in the US.  They were looking for a new US company to offer this product so I started offering this in April 2017 along with their parachute release mechanisms.  www.uavpropulsiontech.com/eli-airborne-systems


Reventec, LTD – United Kingdom:  I have a fuel system background and worked 14 years in the automotive fuel delivery market developing/marketing in tank fuel delivery modules.  I was looking for a company that offers advanced fuel and engine sensors and found Reventec.  They have advanced sensors that they provide to the Formula 1 racing market and have an excellent reputation in that market.  These advanced sensors are also suited for UAV applications.  They include capacitive fuel level sensors, ultrasonic fuel flow sensors, engine temp sensors, rotary position sensors and speed sensors.  I started offering Reventec sensors in May 2017.  www.uavpropulsiontech.com/reventec


Neva Aerospace – UK/France:  There are several companies with a roadmap to develop a flying car and Neva is one of those companies that has advanced electric turbofan (ETF) solutions that are optimized for static thrust and  VTOL operation.   They provide ETF’s, drones based on their ETF’s and eventually will be offering a certified flying car.  ETF’s are a great solution for UAV developers who are looking for a VTOL solution that needs static thrust for vertical take-off combined with propellers or gas turbines for forward flight.   I started offering Neva ETF solutions in May 2017 and just returned from the UK/France for training on this advanced UAV technology.  www.uavpropulsiontech.com/neva


Coral Partners Nova Ray ROV – USA:  I have expanded from unmanned aerial vehicles to submersible remote operated vehicles for underwater inspection/mapping.  Nova Ray’s ROV can be tethered behind a boat and maintains stability up to 10knots increasing the mapping efficiency.  They have solutions that can operate at 305m, 550m, 1500m & 4000m depths.  I started offering these solutions to the military and oil/gas markets since August 2017.  http://uavpropulsiontech.com/nova-ray-rov/


No longer representing Orbital UAVe – Australia: As of OCT 2017, I am no longer representing Orbital in the USA.  Orbital has brought business development in house as they expand into the USA with their recently announced production facility in Hood River, OR.  I have worked with Orbital since 2000 and wish them continued success.


Key News/Achievements from represented companies:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Coming in 2018:

I plan to add more companies to be able to offer more UAV hardware solutions.  Discussions going on to add these solutions in Q1.  More to follow the rest of the year.

  • Inertial navigation systems.
  • Hyperspectral cameras
  • 3D printed airframes

Key UAV News for the Week:

Industry Events for January:

Quote for the week:

“In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity.” – Albert Einstein.

UAV Propulsion Tech is unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) hardware solution provider of propulsion, servo, autopilot, rescue/recovery parachutes, electric turbofans, pneumatic launchers, capacitive liquid level sensors, engine sensors and gyro-stabilized EO/IR gimbal solutions. Click on the HOME link above or go to www.uavpropulsiontech.com for more info.

 

UAV Propulsion Tech Post #31 – Perspectives on UAV Fly Away

I am the US rep for MicroPilot and market their autopilots to US UAV customers.  I have permission from MicroPilot to re-print a Blog Post they have on their website titled “Going, Going, Gone..” from November 14, 2017 about UAV/drone fly away.   Drone fly away is a big issue especially as more and more hobby, commercial and defense aircraft are using civilian airspace.   MicroPilot autopilots minimize this risk thru design of the hardware & software, product validation testing (component, true hardware in loop and flight) and production procedures which includes 100% HASS testing.  Here is a link to a White Paper from MicroPilot that shares “How to Choose a Reliable UAV Autopilot Vendor”.

Going, Going, Gone….

Wrecked_airmail_plane_in_Saugus,_Massachusetts

Some time ago, there was a fly away in Australia that was reasonably well documented in the online media. Given that there is always something to learn from every accident, I will provide my thoughts on this one. I will apologize in advance for any incorrect conclusions I have drawn from the limited facts I have available to me.

The cause of the fly away came down to a latitude/longitude that was incorrectly entered and the GCS software assumed the northern hemisphere instead of the southern hemisphere. One single incorrect character a blank instead of an S, and as a result, the underlying map, that should have covered a small area, ended up covering thousands of kilometers.

The mission was planned using this map and so all way points ended up a thousand or so kilometers from their intended location. After launch, the UAV was flown manually for a short period of time until the radio link was unexpectedly lost. The loss of link failure engaged and the UAV started flying toward it’s preprogrammed home location, a location one thousand kilometers away.

It appears, from the data in the report, that the link was regained (the ground track shows some manual Flight and then the vehicle flying away toward it’s home location). The system had a manual mode so it should have been possible to take control of the UAV manually and return; however, from the description of the incident, it seems that engaging manual mode was complex and was not engaged in time to fly the UAV back manually.

The ground track doesn’t last long. It ends about 165 meters away from the ground station. This does not appear to be a fault in the radio link because the ground station was set up next to a hill. The hill would have blocked communications to the north and the last recorded position is consistent with the UAV flying behind the hill.

This incident has all the hallmarks of a typical aviation accident and there are a number of lessons one can learn from thus incident:

Lesson 1: It’s never just one thing
In virtually every aviation accident there is not one single cause; it’s almost always a chain of events, and if you break one link in the chain the accident doesn’t happen. In this particular incident there are actually seven factors that lead to this fly away.

1. Obviously an incorrectly georeferenced map was a major contributor.
2. The system did not warn the operators that the waypoints were unreasonably far away from the location where the UAV was initialized.
3. The operators probably hadn’t practiced emergency procedures (this is a guess).
4. The system had an overly complex procedure for taking manual control.
5. The system did not show the UAV’s GPS location relative to the programmed way points (and for that matter, map), prior to takeoff. Either that or the operator didn’t notice the inconsistency between the UAV’s Flight path and the location of the waypoints.
6. If communications hadn’t been blocked by the hill it is quite possible that the operator would have had more time to recover.
7. The manufacturer’s checklists where a bit vague and did not contain clearly defined measures to check for incorrectly Georeferenced maps.

Lesson 2: Blaming operator error isn’t helpful
A long time ago, aviation accidents were often blamed on pilot error. Certainly, in many accidents, the pilot had made a mistake. After a while, the industry came to realize that blaming the pilot was not productive. Pilots made mistakes, had always made mistakes, and would always make mistakes. And so, the goal became to surround the pilot with systems and processes that tolerated these mistakes. Here we have systems and procedures that don’t tolerate operator mistakes.

Lesson 3: Aviate, Navigate then Communicate
This is an old saying from the aviation world. Many minor incidents turned into major accidents because the pilot became distracted dealing with the emergency and simply forgot to keep flying the plane. It is possible that in their attempt to determine why their UAV was headed off in an unexpected direction the operators forgot to fly the plane (i.e. take over manual control and land the UAV manually). The facts are ambiguous on this point but this is a worthwhile topic nonetheless.

There is no mention in the report of any attempt to make contact with Air Traffic Control once the UAV had flown away. There was an airport only a few kilometers away and a warning about a UAS flying away would have been appropriate. When you fly, do you have the phone number of the nearest air traffic control in case you need it?

Lesson 4: Practice makes perfect
In piloted aviation, there is a lot of emphasis on practicing emergency procedures. It is hard to respond to an emergency if you rarely, or worse, never, practice. Timely reaction to emergencies is especially important when operating a drone as the drone is often rapidly moving away from you which limits your time to respond.

Lesson 5: Learn from every mistake
It’s a lot more pleasant (and cheaper), to learn from the mistakes of others than it is to learn from your own mistakes. There is always something to learn from every mistake but human nature means we minimize our role in any accident. This makes it more difficult to learn from our own mistakes and is where the saying ‘accidents happen’ originates. Certainly, accidents happen but many, many accidents can be prevented.

It is also valuable to look beyond the circumstances of the particular accident in question. Often when you carefully examine a particular accident you will realize there are other potential accidents that are similar. For example, this incident involves flying to an unintended location. A fly away in the horizontal direction. However, drones operate in three dimensions so there is another type of fly away – in the vertical direction. If you enter an altitude of 510 instead of 150 (transposing digits is a common data entry error), your drone will climb far above your intended altitude.

To their credit, the operators of this drone reported this incident to the authorities and clearly participated in the investigation. Hopefully, the operators have learned valuable lessons, the manufacturer of this UAV will take steps to make the system more error proof, and the wider UAV community will also learn from this incident.

For the record, MicroPilot autopilots have features that would have prevented this accident. Manual mode is simple and quick to engage and always overrides autonomous mode – no input is necessary from the GCS software. During initialization, MicroPilot autopilots check all waypoints to make sure they are a reasonable distance from the initialization point. MicroPilot autopilots are usually configured to fly back to their initialization point when they lose link and not an absolute location. We also support relative waypoints in addition to absolute waypoints, which simplifies describing how failures should be handled.

If you have any questions regarding MicroPilot’s autopilot solutions, please call or email me at:  bob@uavpropulsiontech.com.  PH: +1 (810) 441-1457.  Here is the original link to the MicroPilot Blog “Going, Going, Gone..”.

You can also visit my MicroPilot page at www.uavpropulsiontech.com/micropilot or MicroPilot’s website at www.micropilot.com.


Key UAV News for the Week:

Industry Events for December:

Quote for the week:

“The only source of knowledge is experience.” – Albert Einstein.

UAV Propulsion Tech is unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) hardware solution provider of propulsion, servo, autopilot, rescue/recovery parachutes, electric turbofans, pneumatic launchers, capacitive liquid level sensors, engine sensors and gyro-stabilized EO/IR gimbal solutions. Click on the HOME link above or go to www.uavpropulsiontech.com for more info.

 

UAV Propulsion Tech Post #30 – UAV Engine/Fuel Sensors

I started representing Reventec, Ltd. out of the UK to market their advanced engine and fuel sensors into the UAV market.  Reventec is well known in the Formula 1 racing industry and uses some pretty high tech sensor technology to measure engine and fuel parameters.  UAV’s are starting to use these high tech sensors to measure fuel level, fuel flow, engine speed, engine temperature and throttle position.  The racing industry drove the design for high reliability and accuracy which are the  same requirements for UAV applications. I thought I would focus my blog on these solutions that are available by Reventec, Ltd.  These sensors can interface with the UAV flight computer to monitor the propulsion and fuel delivery parameters: fuel level, fuel flow, oil level, cylinder head temperature, engine rpm and throttle position.

LIQUID LEVEL SENSING (FUEL OR OIL):

Capacitive level sensing technology works by simply measuring the permittivity difference between air and the fluid level change between the probe’s electrodes.  An electronic circuit is used to measure this change in liquid level and the sensor output changes from 0.25V (empty) to 4.75V (full).   These sensors are designed for 12V but can handle supply voltages from 6V to 31V, they are resistant to several fluids, can be used in environments from -40C to +125C and have an ingress protection rating of IP67.

EcoSense Liquid Level Sensor

EcoSense is a next-generation solid-state capacitive sensor, capable of continuous level measurement in all common liquid types. The modular sensor allows for a wide range of mounting options with the use of a custom or stock mounting adaptor.

  • Solid-state, continuous liquid level sensing
  • ±2% full scale accuracy
  • No measurement dead-band
  • FIA homologation certified
  • 0-5V Configurable Output
  • Customisable Length
  • Multiple mounting arrangements available

2017-07-26_15-17-02

 

ProSense Carbon Liquid Level Sensors

ProSense™ capacitive level sensors are custom designed to your requirements. Proven in harsh environment applications and the sensors are suitable for use with most liquid types.

  • Suitable for all common fuels, hydrocarbons and other liquids
  • Solid-state, continuous liquid level sensing
  • ±0.5% full scale accuracy
  • Designed for long-term reliability in harsh environments
  • Custom designed to your requirements

2017-07-26_15-29-34


Engine Sensors:

Quantum 360 Temp sensor new QuantumSS Speed Sensor

BROCHURES:

You can find out more info about these fuel/engine sensors by visiting my Reventec Page at http://uavpropulsiontech.com/reventec-liquid-level-sensors-engine-throttletempspeed-sensors/.  If you have any questions regarding these solutions, please call or email me at:  bob@uavpropulsiontech.com.  PH: +1 (810) 441-1457


Key UAV News for the Week:

Industry Events for October:

Quote for the week:

“You never fail until you stop trying.” – Albert Einstein.

UAV Propulsion Tech is unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) hardware solution provider of propulsion, servo, autopilot, rescue/recovery parachutes, electric turbofans, pneumatic launchers, capacitive liquid level sensors, engine sensors and gyro-stabilized EO/IR gimbal solutions. Click on the HOME link above or go to www.uavpropulsiontech.com for more info.

 

 

UAV Propulsion Tech Post #29 – Top 10 US Military UAV’s

I have put together a list  that I think is representative of the key US military UAV’s.  When you are limited to 10 spots you do leave some out (like Northrop Grumman’s Hunter and Aerovironments Wasp) and did lump General Atomics Predator’s together as a family.  I am mainly just  going to list the UAV’s with photo’s and include the manufacturer’s website where you can get more info.  All info is in the public domain.

A couple of really good resources I use to investigate global UAV applications are noted below:

  • Shephard’s Media – Military Unmanned  Systems Handbook.  They now also have a Commercial Unmanned Systems Handbook.  As of this writing, it isn’t available yet.  I think it  will be available fall of 2017 at an upcoming commercial UAV trade show.
  • Armada International Compendium Unmanned Systems.  This comes out in FEB and there is always a pull-out in the center with most of the major global UAV systems.

The UAV’s are just noted from smallest to largest (not based on popularity).


#1: Aerovironment’s RQ-11B Raven®

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Website: http://www.avinc.com/uas


#2: Aerovironment’s RQ-20B Puma™ AE

Website: http://www.avinc.com/uas


#3: Boeing/Insitu’s Scan Eagle

Website: https://insitu.com


#4 Textron Unmanned Systems Aerosonde Mk4.7

Website: www.textronsystems.com


#5 Boeing/Insitu’s Integrator & RQ-21A Blackjack

Website: https://insitu.com


#6: Textron Unmanned Systems RQ-7Bv2 Shadow 200

Website: www.textronsystems.com


#7 Northrop Grumman MQ-8 Fire Scout

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Website: http://www.northropgrumman.com/Capabilities/FireScout/Pages/default.aspx


#8 General Atomics Aeronautical Predator Family

Website: http://www.ga-asi.com/aircraft-platforms


#9 Northrop Grumman x47B UCAS

Website: http://www.northropgrumman.com/Capabilities/X47BUCAS/Pages/default.aspx


#10 Northrop Grumman RQ-4 Global Hawk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Website: http://www.northropgrumman.com/Capabilities/GlobalHawk/Pages/default.aspx


Key UAV News for the Week:

Industry Events for September:

Quote for the week:

“In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity” – Albert Einstein.

UAV Propulsion Tech  is unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) hardware solution provider of propulsion, servo, autopilot, rescue/recovery parachutes, electric turbofans, pneumatic launchers, capacitive liquid level sensors, engine sensors and gyro-stabilized EO/IR gimbal solutions.  Click on the HOME link above or go to www.uavpropulsiontech.com for more info.

 

UAV Propulsion Tech Post #27 – COTS UAV Servos

Blog post #27

I am the US representative for Volz Servos GmbH & Co. Kg located in Offenbach, Germany.  They produce high end actuators for industrial and aerospace applications.  They have been in business over 30 years and have several COTS solutions and can also develop custom solutions.  Volz servos are flying on several global UAV platforms around the world including the following (in the public domain): Lockheed Martin Fury 1500, Northrop Grumman BAT, AAI Corp Aerosonde Mk4.7, Aeronautics Orbiter, EADS Cassidian DO-DT target drones, Orbital Scan Eagle engine for Insitu, and Schiebel Camcopter S-100. Volz have high end optional features such as brushless motors, contactless postion sensor, position feedback, redundant solutions and clutch mechanisms for OPV (optionally piloted vehicle) applications.  All hardware has traceability which can be difficult to obtain from high volume hobby RC servos.  Volz is also ISO9001:2008 certified and applies advanced quality systems for demanding UAV requirements.  This can include 100% HASS (highly accelerated stress screening) or even custom measurements depending on customer needs.

Volz blog

Key features of Volz servos are:

  • CNC machined aluminum actuator case.
  • IP67 standard for water/dust intrusion protection.
  • Multi purpose lug mounts for variable servo fixation.
  • Integrated microprocessor controlled PC boards.
  • Fully programmable by the customer.

Optional features:

  • ISS System protects gear train against shock loads.
  • Serial communication interface (DA26/DA30 and larger).
  • Wear free position sensor for improved reliability/life.
  • Brushless motor for improved reliability/life.

Volz does produce small servos (DA10 & DA13) but I am focusing on the main servos that are typically used for UAV applications in this blog post.  I have noted the COTS DA14-DA30 options below (including throttle, submersible, and OPV-optionally piloted vehicle alternatives).

DA14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DA14 (14mm class) – Link to datasheet/CAD

DA15

DA15 (15mm class) – Link to datasheet/CAD

DA20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DA20 (20mm class) – Link to datasheet/CAD

DA22 blog

DA22 (22mm class) – Link to datasheet/CAD

DA26 blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DA26 (26mm class) – Link to datasheet/CAD

DA30 blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DA30 (30mm class) – Link to datasheet/CAD

Redundant blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Duplex – Redundant Class – Link to datasheet/CAD

OPV blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OPV (optionally piloted vehicle) Class – Includes electro-mechanical clutch – Link to datasheet/CAD

throttle blog

Throttle servo class – Link to datasheet/CAD

Due to the high reliability of these servos, they have been selected by some of the largest UAV producers in the world.  I have noted the references below that are in the public domain.

2017-02-10_8-03-32

You can find out more info about these servo actuator solutions by visiting my Volz page at www.uavpropulsiontech.com/volz or the Volz website at www.volz-servos.com.  If you have any questions regarding these solutions, please call or email me at: bob@uavpropulsiontech.com.  PH: +1 (810) 441-1457


Key UAV News for the Week:

Industry Events for February:

Quote for the week:

“We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.” – Albert Einstein.

UAV Propulsion Tech is unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) hardware solution provider of propulsion, servo, autopilot, rescue/recovery parachutes, electric turbofans, pneumatic launchers, capacitive liquid level sensors, engine sensors and gyro-stabilized EO/IR gimbal solutions. Click on the HOME link above or go to www.uavpropulsiontech.com for more info.

 

 

UAV Propulsion Tech Post #26 – My Interview w/POMS & Associates about How Drones Are Being Used Today

poms-expert-interview

CLICK ON LINK TO GO TO POMS INTERVIEW


Key UAV News for the Week:

Industry Events for November:

Quote for the week:

“A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new.” – Albert Einstein.

Stay involved and engaged – SUBSCRIBE

UAV Propulsion Tech Post #25 – Highlights from the Commercial UAV Expo 2016

blog-post-25

I attended the Commercial UAV Expo that was held at the MGM Grand Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada.  I arrived on OCT 31st and supported the MicroPilot booth during the Halloween reception and also supported on NOV 1st.  I also got a chance to check out the show and thought it would be good to show some of the things I saw.  The first thing I noticed that was different from the Interdrone show I attended a month previously is there were fewer hobby companies exhibiting which is to be expected since it had a “commercial” focus.  Check out their website for more info: http://www.expouav.com/

imag3728

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a shot of me at the MicroPilot booth.  I supported Kyle Hayes who is an engineer from MicroPilot.  We had lots of interest in our board mount, enclosed and triple redundant autopilots as the commercial guys were looking for a more reliable solution than the hobby hardware that they are currently flying.  Particularly those that have expensive air vehicles and payloads like  LiDAR.  Check out my MicroPilot page for more info: http://www.uavpropulsiontech.com/micropilot.

The one thing I noticed while walking the show is there were lots of helicopters on display.  Solutions from Pulse Aero, Leptron, Altus Intelligence, and Swiss Drones.

imag3742

 

Pulse Aerospace had their Vapor 55 on display with a LiDAR package.  You can find out more about their solutions by visiting: http://www.pulseaero.com/.

imag3747

 

Altus Intelligence out of New Zealand had their ORC4 helicopter on display.  You can find out more about Altus Intelligence by visiting their website at: https://altusintelligence.com/.

imag3766

Swiss Drones had their SDO 50V2 helicopter on display.  This was a very impressive helicopter using a gas turbine engine (for reduced vibration for enhanced sensor performance), and capable of a 50kg payload.  They can carry a multispectral camera or crop spraying system.  You can find out more by visiting: http://www.swissdrones.com/

army_avenger

 

 

I neglected to get a picture at the show of the Leptron Avenger helicopter so had to grab one from their website.  They have two variants (electric and gasoline engine) providing 20 min or 2hr endurance respectively.  Payloads of EO/IR and LiDAR as well as HD video.   Check out their website for more info: http://www.leptron.com/

imag3751

 

 

 

Another interesting find was the “Wingcopter” hybrid UAV out of Germany.  This was on display at the MultiRotor booth  and has rotating propellers to transition from VTOL to horizontal flight.  You can find more about this solution by visiting http://www.wingcopter.com/ or http://www.multirotor.net.

imag3756

 

 

 

 

 

 

Payloads also had a good presence especially LiDAR and infrared.  Velodyne are LiDAR experts and have released three new LiDAR’s this year.  These include: Puck Hi-Res™ sensor,  VLP-16 Puck™ and the Puck LITE™.  You can find out more about Velodyne by visiting: http://velodynelidar.com/index.html

imag3770

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have read about the flying bird solution from Clear Flight Solutions but this was the first time to see it first hand.  This is a great product with flapping wings that provides a unique ISR solution that is less noticeable than a multicopter or fixed wing with electric or piston engines.  I would think this would provide some stealth capability that could be beneficial.  From what I understand they don’t sell the system but are building a global service business using these birds.  You can find out more by visiting: http://clearflightsolutions.com/.


Key UAV News for the Week:

Industry Events for November:

Quote for the week:

“Logic will get you from A to B.  Imagination will take you everywhere.” – Albert Einstein.

Stay involved and engaged – SUBSCRIBE

 

UAV Propulsion Tech Post #24 – Info Graphic: The Rise of the Drone Industry

The info graphic is courtesy of The Drone Worx company out of the UK and is published on this blog with their permission. They are a hobby/commercial drone retailer. You can find out more info by visiting http://www.thedroneworx.co.uk


Key UAV News for the Week:

Industry Events for October:

Quote for the week:

“The finite mind tries to limit the infinite.” – Toba Beta

Stay involved and engaged – SUBSCRIBE

UAV Propulsion Tech Post #23 – Slideshare: Top 10 Blogs from UAV Propulsion Tech

I have been posting blogs on UAV Propulsion Tech for about a year and a half so I wanted to check my Google Analytics for blog post activity from JAN-OCT 2016. I summarized the results in the Slideshare below:


Key UAV News for the Week:

Industry Events for October:

Quote for the week:

“Only those who attempt the absurd can achieve the impossible.” – Albert Einstein

UAV Propulsion Tech is unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) hardware solution provider of propulsion, servo, autopilot, rescue/recovery parachutes, electric turbofans, pneumatic launchers, capacitive liquid level sensors, engine sensors and gyro-stabilized EO/IR gimbal solutions. Click on the HOME link above or go to www.uavpropulsiontech.com for more info.

 

UA-43364839-1